Dogfish

5" x 10" $200
Edition of 5, 2004
Printed on white Yatsuo paper

The spiny dogfish shark was once abundant in temperate waters all over the world. Today, overfishing has led to serious depletion in many areas, particularly the North Atlantic. Fishing industries target the largest (usually pregnant) females to serve European demand for dogfish meat, resulting in serious damage to populations. Spiny dogfish grow slowly, mature late, and give birth to only about six young at a time, after a record two-year pregnancy. Thus, like most other sharks, they are easily overfished and slow to recover once depleted. The Northeast Atlantic spiny dogfish population has declined more than 90% from former levels and is now considered "endangered" by the IUCN-World Conservation Union. The dogfish population off the U.S. Mid-Atlantic and New England regions has declined by 75% since the fishery began and needs at least 20 years of strict fishing limits to recover.

U.S. Federal and state recovery plans to end targeted fishing of Atlantic spiny dogfish are now in place, but constantly challenged. Dogfish fisheries are gearing up off the Pacific Northwest under little regulation. Contact your members of Congress and express your support for strong, national fisheries legislation and stringent, regional dogfish recovery plans off both coasts.

Information provided by The Ocean Conservancy. To learn more about its work advocating for wild, healthy oceans, please visit www.oceanconservancy.org

Dogfish