Swordfish

10" x 5" $200
Edition of 7, 2003
Printed on white Moriki paper

Swordfish are large highly migratory predators uniquely adapted to the conditions and challenges of the open ocean. While swordfish are cold-blooded animals, they have special organs to heat their eyes and their brain. This physical adaptation greatly improves the vision enhancing their ability to catch prey. Forty years ago, the average weight of a swordfish was more than 300 lbs. By the mid-1990s, persistent overfishing reduced the average weight to a mere 90 lbs. Indeed, decades of intense fishing pressure brought swordfish to the verge of commercial extinction. In the late 1990s, thanks in part to increased involvement by conservation groups, the U.S. government imposed strict catch limits, closed sensitive nursery grounds to fishing, and secured international cooperation on swordfish management. As a result, swordfish populations have rebuilt to 94% of healthy population sizes. Still, the success of rebuilding efforts is tenuous and depends on continued adherence to management measures and greater scientific understanding of the species and its environment.

You can help by contacting the Secretary of Commerce to voice your appreciation for swordfish rebuilding efforts and U.S. vigilance in international fish conservation negotiations.

Information provided by The Ocean Conservancy. To learn more about its work advocating for wild, healthy oceans, please visit www.oceanconservancy.org

Swordfish